Undergraduate Program Outcomes

Biochemistry

BMSc graduates with an Honors Specialization in Biochemistry should be able to:

  • describe the fundamental mechanisms of the core biochemical processes performed by living systems
  • safely and competently perform common laboratory procedures in biochemistry, using common instrumentation, and apply guidance to overcome experimental challenges
  • correlate and integrate biochemical concepts with ideas originating in other disciplines of study
  • choose and use software as appropriate to access and analyze biochemical data
  • document and present their work and ideas to scientific colleagues, in appropriate written and oral formats that can be either formal or informal, to enable meaningful professional discussions
  • identify limitations in their own biochemical understanding, and the limits of knowledge in the field
  • work at their professional activities with curiosity, energy, persistence, and determination
  • relate and apply current discoveries and developments in biochemistry to societal attitudes or challenges related to health and biotechnology
  • explain biochemical concepts, invoke biochemical evidence, and demonstrate the importance of biochemistry to society in language that can be understood by lay audiences
  • formulate biochemical hypotheses, defend their plausibility, and evaluate potential experimental approaches or technologies to test them
  • find, evaluate, and interpret, using statistical tests as appropriate, experimental data and information in large datasets and the scientific literature, and use this information to develop hypotheses or arguments, draw appropriate conclusions, and evaluate truth claims
  • express and defend their opinions, and incorporate their ideas and perspectives with those of others, while working effectively as a member of a team
  • explain the commonly accepted ethical framework for the responsible conduct of research, and act consistently with that framework 

Biochemistry and Cancer Biology

BMSc graduates with an Honors Specialization in Biochemistry and Cancer Biology should be able to:

  • describe the fundamental mechanisms of the core biochemical, cellular, genetic, and immunological processes performed by living systems, how these processes are perturbed in cancer cells, and how this knowledge can be used to develop new cancer treatments
  • safely and competently perform common laboratory procedures relevant to cancer research, using common instrumentation, and apply guidance to overcome experimental challenges
  • correlate and integrate concepts originating in a variety of disciplines of study (e.g., biochemistry, immunology, pathology, and pharmacology) , and apply these concepts to the problem of cancer
  • choose and use software as appropriate to access and analyze data related to cancer biology, demonstrating computer literacy and numeracy skills
  • document and present their work and ideas to scientific colleagues, in appropriate written and oral formats that can be either formal or informal, to enable meaningful professional discussions
  • identify limitations in their own understanding of cancer biology, and the limits of knowledge in the field and contributing disciplines
  • work at their professional activities with curiosity, energy, persistence, and determination
  • identify, describe, and analyze career opportunities in the field of cancer biology
  • partner with members of the community to understand how current discoveries and developments in cancer biology and cancer treatment affect cancer patients, their families, and the healthcare system
  • explain complex information related to cancer and demonstrate the importance of cancer-related research to members of the public, including community partners, in language that can be understood by lay audiences
  • formulate scientific hypotheses, defend their plausibility, and evaluate potential experimental approaches or technologies to test them
  • find, evaluate, and interpret, using statistical tests as appropriate, experimental data and information in large datasets and the scientific literature, and use this information to develop hypotheses or arguments, draw appropriate conclusions, and evaluate truth claims
  • respectfully incorporate their ideas and perspectives with those of others (including professionals and members of the community) as part of a team that develops a cancer-related implementation program
  • explain the commonly accepted ethical framework for the responsible conduct of research, and act consistently with that framework

Biochemistry and Cell Biology

BMSc graduates with an Honors Specialization in Biochemistry and Cell Biology should be able to:

  • describe the structure-function relationships and fundamental mechanisms of the mammalian body at the biochemical, cellular, histological, and anatomical levels, and discuss how these relationships and mechanisms are disturbed in disease states
  • safely and competently perform common laboratory procedures in biochemistry and cell biology, using common instrumentation, and apply guidance to overcome experimental challenges
  • correlate and integrate concepts in biochemistry and cell biology with ideas originating in other disciplines of study
  • choose and use software as appropriate to access and analyze biological data
  • document and present their work and ideas to scientific colleagues, in appropriate written and oral formats (e.g., posters, abstracts, presentations, or research papers) that can be either formal or informal, to enable meaningful professional discussions
  • identify limitations in their own understanding of biochemistry and cell biology, and the limits of knowledge in these fields
  • work at their professional activities with curiosity, energy, persistence, and determination
  • relate and apply current discoveries and developments in biochemistry and cell biology to societal attitudes or challenges related to health and biotechnology
  • explain concepts in biochemistry and cell biology, invoke scientific evidence, and demonstrate the importance of biochemistry and cell biology to society in language that can be understood by lay audiences
  • formulate scientific hypotheses (with clinical relevance as appropriate), defend their plausibility, and evaluate potential experimental approaches or technologies to test them
  • find, evaluate, and interpret, using statistical tests as appropriate, experimental data and information in large datasets and the scientific literature, and use this information to develop hypotheses or arguments, draw appropriate conclusions, and evaluate truth claims
  • express and defend their opinions, and incorporate their ideas and perspectives with those of others, while working effectively as a member of a team
  • explain the commonly accepted ethical framework for the responsible conduct of research, and act consistently with that framework

Biochemistry and Chemistry

BMSc graduates with an Honors Specialization in Biochemistry and Chemistry should be able to:

  • describe the fundamental scientific principles in the subfields of chemistry and biochemistry, and apply these principles to problems.
  • explain, integrate and apply relevant knowledge to problems that emerge from the broader interdisciplinary subfields (life, environmental, materials and medical sciences).
  • identify and describe the underlying principles behind chemical techniques relevant to academia, industry and government.
  • with guidance, be able to apply the methodologies in order to conduct chemical syntheses, analyses or other chemical investigations.
  • obtain information from library, online and literature resources that will support the solving of chemical and research problems.
  • use chemical knowledge to predict and rationalize properties, mechanisms and patterns of reactivity.
  • develop a testable hypothesis, execute research experiments, compile raw data and provide conclusions.
  • prepare logical, organized and concise written reports, and oral and poster presentations that effectively communicate chemical content to other scientists.
  • field questions pertaining to chemical theory, research experimental design and data interpretation.
  • recognize assumptions and limitations in the scientific models and simulations, and propose their possible impact on the results.
  • evaluate the accuracy of, and the sources of errors in, experimental measurements.
  • work productively and collaboratively as a team member.
  • conduct laboratory experiments safely; evaluate the potential impact chemistry may have on society, health, and the environment.

Biochemistry of Infection and Immunity

BMSc graduates with an Honors Specialization in Biochemistry of Infection and Immunity should be able to:

  • describe the fundamental mechanisms of the core biochemical processes performed by living systems as well as key concepts in immunology (e.g., immune components, mechanisms, deficiencies, vaccine strategies, and immunotherapeutics) and microbiology (e.g., microbial ecology, structure, replication, pathogenesis, and genetics, the microbiome, antimicrobial therapies, and microbes in industry and environments)
  • safely and competently perform common laboratory procedures in biochemistry, microbiology, or immunology using common instrumentation, and apply guidance to overcome experimental challenges
  • correlate and integrate concepts in biochemistry, microbiology, and immunology with ideas originating in other disciplines of study, particularly in the areas of health and infectious disease
  • choose and use software as appropriate to access and analyze scientific data
  • document and present their work and ideas to scientific colleagues, in appropriate written and oral formats that can be either formal or informal, to enable meaningful professional discussions
  • identify limitations in their own understanding of biochemistry, microbiology, and immunology, and the limits of knowledge in these fields
  • work at their professional activities with curiosity, energy, persistence, and determination
  • relate and apply current discoveries and developments in biochemistry, microbiology, and immunology to societal attitudes or challenges related to health and biotechnology, particularly related to the benefits and challenges of vaccination
  • explain concepts in biochemistry, microbiology, and immunology, invoke relevant evidence, and demonstrate the importance of these disciplines to society in language that can be understood by lay audiences
  • formulate scientific hypotheses, defend their plausibility, and evaluate potential experimental approaches or technologies to test them
  • find, evaluate, and interpret, using statistical tests as appropriate, experimental data and information in large datasets and the scientific literature, and use this information to develop hypotheses or arguments, draw appropriate conclusions, and evaluate truth claims
  • express and defend their opinions, and incorporate their ideas and perspectives with those of others, while working effectively as a member of a team
  • explain the commonly accepted ethical framework for the responsible conduct of research, and act consistently with that framework

Biochemistry and Pathology of Human Disease

BMSc graduates with an Honors Specialization in Biochemistry and Pathology of Human Disease should be able to:

  • describe the fundamental properties and mechanisms of living systems at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ level
  • describe at a basic level how disease states arise, how they present through clinical signs and symptoms, and their pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment
  • safely and competently perform common laboratory procedures in biochemistry and pathology, using common instrumentation, and apply guidance to overcome experimental challenges
  • correlate and integrate concepts in biochemistry and pathology with ideas originating in other disciplines of study, including physical and social determinants of human health
  • choose and use software as appropriate to access and analyze biochemical data
  • document and present their work and ideas to scientific colleagues, in appropriate written and oral formats that can be either formal or informal, to enable meaningful professional discussions
  • identify limitations in their own understanding of biochemistry and pathology, and the limits of knowledge in these fields
  • work at their professional activities with curiosity, energy, persistence, and determination
  • relate and apply current discoveries and developments in biochemistry and pathology to societal attitudes or challenges related to health and biotechnology
  • explain concepts in biochemistry and pathology, invoke scientific evidence, and demonstrate the importance of biochemistry and pathology to society in language that can be understood by lay audiences
  • formulate scientific hypotheses, defend their plausibility, and evaluate potential experimental approaches or technologies to test them
  • find, evaluate, and interpret, using statistical tests as appropriate, experimental data and information in large datasets and the scientific literature, and use this information to develop hypotheses or arguments, draw appropriate conclusions, and evaluate truth claims
  • express and defend their opinions, and incorporate their ideas and perspectives with those of others, while working effectively as a member of a team
  • explain the commonly accepted ethical framework for the responsible conduct of research, and act consistently with that framework

Chemical Biology

BMSc graduates with an Honors Specialization in Chemical Biology should be able to:

  • describe the fundamental mechanisms of the core biochemical processes performed by living systems
  • safely and competently perform common laboratory procedures in biochemistry and chemistry, using common instrumentation, and apply guidance to overcome experimental challenges
  • describe the fundamental scientific principles in the subfields of chemistry, and apply these principles to biological problems
  • correlate and integrate concepts in chemical biology with ideas originating in other disciplines of study
  • choose and use software as appropriate to access and analyze chemical and biochemical data
  • document and present their work and ideas to scientific colleagues, in appropriate written and oral formats that can be either formal or informal, to enable meaningful professional discussions
  • identify limitations in their own understanding of biochemistry and chemistry, and the limits of knowledge in the field
  • work at their professional activities with curiosity, energy, persistence, and determination
  • relate and apply current discoveries and developments in chemical biology to societal attitudes or challenges related to health and biotechnology
  • explain concepts in chemical biology, invoke biochemical evidence, and demonstrate the importance of chemical biology to society in language that can be understood by lay audiences
  • formulate hypotheses in the field of chemical biology, defend their plausibility, and evaluate potential experimental approaches or technologies to test them
  • find, evaluate, and interpret, using statistical tests as appropriate, experimental data and information in large datasets and the scientific literature, and use this information to develop hypotheses or arguments, draw appropriate conclusions, and evaluate truth claims
  • express and defend their opinions, and incorporate their ideas and perspectives with those of others, while working effectively as a member of a team
  • explain the commonly accepted ethical framework for the responsible conduct of research, and act consistently with that framework

Computational Biochemistry

BMSc graduates with an Honors Specialization in Computational Biochemistry should be able to:

  • describe the fundamental mechanisms of the core biochemical processes performed by living systems
  • explain the principles upon which common laboratory techniques in biochemistry are based
  • describe the algorithms of common computational and statistical techniques in the life sciences
  • correlate and integrate biochemical concepts with ideas originating in other disciplines of study
  • choose and use software or algorithms as appropriate, and develop programs when necessary, to access biochemical datasets, transform them into appropriate and useable forms, and analyze the data they contain
  • document and present their work and ideas to scientific colleagues, in appropriate written and oral formats that can be either formal or informal, to enable meaningful professional discussions
  • identify limitations in their own understanding of biochemistry and bioinformatics, and the limits of knowledge in the field
  • work at their professional activities with curiosity, energy, persistence, and determination
  • relate and apply current discoveries and developments in biochemistry and bioinformatics to societal attitudes or challenges related to health and biotechnology
  • explain biochemical concepts, invoke biochemical evidence, and demonstrate the importance of biochemistry to society in language that can be understood by lay audiences
  • formulate biochemical hypotheses, defend their plausibility, and evaluate potential computational biological experimental approaches or technologies to test them
  • find, evaluate, and interpret, using statistical tests as appropriate, experimental data and information in large datasets and the scientific literature, and use this information to develop hypotheses or arguments, draw appropriate conclusions, and evaluate truth claims
  • express and defend their opinions, and incorporate their ideas and perspectives with those of others, while working effectively as a member of a team
  • explain the commonly accepted ethical framework for the responsible conduct of research, and act consistently with that framework

Genetics and Biochemistry

Graduates from an Honors Specialization in Genetics and Biochemistry should be able to:

  • describe the breadth of biochemical and genetic mechanisms, as well as the depth of their integration from, for example, genes to enzymatic mechanism.
  • identify and explain at a basic level fundamental concepts in genetics and biochemistry, including:
    o the basic structure and function of the cell, the basic unit of all living things;
    o the processes underlying development, cellular differentiation, and reproduction;
    o the relationship between form and function in biology, as expressed in cellular and whole organism physiology;
    o the principles of inheritance including molecular mechanisms, reproductive strategies, and population genetics;
    o the processes and patterns of biological evolution and the role of evolution as the central unifying concept in biology;
    o the mechanisms organisms use for the sensing and perception of the internal and external environments through communication and signalling systems;
    o the common structural and functional characteristics of biological molecules and macromolecules;
    o the principles of biochemical regulation and control of cellular processes.
  • describe and explain at an advanced level fundamental concepts in genetics and biochemistry, including:
    o the basic structure and function of the cell, the basic unit of all living things;
    o the processes underlying development, cellular differentiation, and reproduction;
    o the relationship between form and function in biology, as expressed in molecular, cellular and whole organism physiology;
    o the principles of inheritance including molecular mechanisms, reproductive strategies, and population genetics;
    o the role of evolution and the central dogma as a central unifying concepts in biology;
    o the molecular mechanisms organisms use for the sensing and perception of the internal and external environments;
    o the common structural and functional characteristics of biological molecules and macromolecules;
    o the principles of biochemical regulation and control of cellular processes.
  • identify and locate sources of primary and secondary literature as well as appropriate electronic genetic and biochemical data, and extract, synthesize information for use in communication and creative thinking.
  • analyze and interpret genetic and biochemical data from figures and tables
  • collect, record, organize and retrieve genetic and biochemical data with accuracy and precision (e.g., with spreadsheet software).
  • present biological information in a clear, concise and organized written form, for example, as would be found in a scientific paper.
  • question and verify scientific validity of biological concepts
  • describe the approach used in genetic or biochemical problems or questions and formulate relevant testable hypotheses.
  • describe the design and execution of experiments that use tools and methods appropriate for genetic or biochemical research.
  • use genetic and biochemical techniques and common instrumentation to collect accurate data.
  • display and practice professional skills in the context of biology including, organization, ethical treatment of organisms and people, time management, collegiality, respect for alternative hypotheses, academic integrity and independence.

Major Module

BMSc graduates with a Major in Biochemistry should be able to:

  • describe the fundamental mechanisms of the core biochemical processes performed by living systems
  • safely and competently perform common laboratory procedures in biochemistry, using common instrumentation
  • correlate and integrate biochemical concepts with ideas originating in other disciplines of study
  • choose and use software as appropriate to access biochemical data
  • document and present their work and ideas to scientific colleagues, in an appropriate written and oral format, to enable meaningful professional discussions
  • identify limitations in their own biochemical understanding, and the limits of knowledge in the field
  • work at their professional activities with curiosity, energy, persistence, and determination
  • relate current discoveries and developments in biochemistry  to societal attitudes or challenges related to health and biotechnology
  • explain biochemical concepts, invoke biochemical evidence, and demonstrate the importance of biochemistry to society in language that can be understood by lay audiences
  • evaluate potential experimental approaches or technologies to test biochemical hypotheses
  • find, evaluate, and interpret information in the scientific literature, and use this information to  draw appropriate conclusions and evaluate truth claims
  • express and defend their opinions, and incorporate their ideas and perspectives with those of others, while working effectively as a member of a team
  • explain the commonly accepted ethical framework for the responsible conduct of research