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Reminder: Learn about the history of pain. Join us for the 2013 Goodman Lectures: Sept. 24 – 26

Thursday, September 19, 2013

The Department of History presents the 2013 Goodman Lectures: "The Flesh is Weak: A History of Pain from the 18th Century to the Present" presented by Joanna Bourke, professor, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck College, University of London, London, England.

Dates:
Tuesday, September 24
Communicating: Talking About Pain from the Eighteenth Century to the Present

Wednesday, September 25
Combat: Pain in War Memoirs from the American Civil War to the Present

Thursday, September 26
Childbirth: Women's Suffering in Childbirth from the 19th Century to the 1960s

Time: 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Location: McKellar Room, UCC, Western University

Format: 45 min. lectures followed by 45 min. Q&A period

Accreditation
This event is an accredited group learning activity (Section 1) as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and approved by Continuing Professional Development, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University (4.5 hours). Each participant should only claim those hours of credit that he/she actually spent participating in this educational program.

Relevance for Physicians
"How are you feeling today?" is often the first question that a physician asks the patient. How patients articulate their illness experience, especially their pain, and how physicians receive and understand this information often shapes their treatment course. According to Professor Joanna Bourke, pain is both unique and shareable. How do (and did) patients speak about pain? Pain narratives are to be valued as part of the healing process, hopefully encouraged and solicited by physicians. Yet changing views about the nature and function of pain may have stripped pain of meaning, and lessened the coherence and function of patient's pain narratives. By paying closer attention to pain narratives, physicians may be more successful in treating their patients. Professor Bourke's lectures, based on her research, highlight the language of pain that opens up a world of meaning, informing us of how people in the past and today experience their suffering.

After a 45 minute lecture on Professor Bourke's research regarding the language of pain, there will be a 45 minute Question-and-Answer period in which physicians may discuss specific case experiences or challenges in understanding divergent pain narratives.

Learning Objectives

1. To recognize the value of patient narratives in the healing process

2. To identify key indicators in the language of pain as guides to a more complex, unspoken
meaning

3. To know the meaning and criticisms of "pain" as it evolved over time and in different cultures

4. To analyse how technologies enable physicians to bypass patient narratives in their search for an "objective diagnosis"

Format and Environment for Learning
Lecture with Q&A - After Prof. Bourke's 45 minute lecture based on her research regarding the language of pain, there will be a 45 minute Question-and-Answer period in which physicians may discuss specific case experiences or challenges in understanding divergent pain narratives.