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Stephen Lomber

Stephen Lomber

Professor
Canada Research Chair in Brain Plasticity and Development


(Joint Appointment with Psychology)
PH.D. Boston University School of Medicine
B.Sc. The University of Rochester
Office:  Social Science Centre, Room 9232
p. 519.663-5777 x.24110
f. 519.663.3193
e. steve.lomber@uwo.ca


Visit: The Cerebral Systems Website
Visit: The Brain and Mind Institute
See Publications by Steve Lomber on PubMed

The Importance of Experience on Brain Development, Cerebral Organization and Cortical Plasticity

The work of our laboratory is guided by the question: "How does experience influence brain development and influence adaptive neuroplasticity?  In order to answer this question we are presently pursuing three different avenues of investigation:

Additional Research Themes Include:

Integration of Ascending, Lateral, and Feedback Signals in the Formation of Sensory Maps
Subcortical Afferent Pathway Mediation of Extrastriate Cortex Function
Cortico-Tectal Interactions Mediating Visuomotor Control

Publications

Lomber, S.G., Meredith, M.A. and Kral, A. (2010) Crossmodal plasticity in specific auditory cortices underlies visual compensations in the deaf. Nature Neuroscience 13: 1421-1427.

Meredith, M.A., Kryklywy, J., McMillan, A.J., Malhotra, S., Lum-Tai, R. and Lomber, S.G. (2011) Crossmodal reorganization in the early-deaf switches sensory, but not behavioral roles of auditory cortex. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA) 108: 8856-8861.

Butler, B.E. and Lomber, S.G. (2013) Functional and structural changes throughout the auditory system following congenital and early-onset deafness: implications for hearing restoration. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience 7:92. pgs. 1-17.

Wong, C., Chabot, N., Kok, M.A., and Lomber, S.G. (2014) Modified areal cartography in auditory cortex following early and late-onset deafness. Cerebral Cortex 24: 1778-1792.

Hall, A.J. and Lomber, S.G. (2015) High-field fMRI reveals tonotopically-organized and core auditory cortex in the cat. Hearing Research 325: 1-11. PMID: 25776742.

Kral, A. and Lomber, S.G. (2015) Deaf white cats. Current Biology 25: R351-353.