Schulich school of Medicine and Dentistry logo Paediatrics Schulich Medicine & Dentistry

Dr. Doug Fraser

Paediatric Critical Care

Office:  C2-C82
Phone:  519.685.8500 ext. 58052
Fax:  519.685.8766
Email:  douglas.fraser@lhsc.on.ca



Dr. Fraser received his MD/PhD in Physiology and Biophysics (Neuroscience Research Group) at the University of Calgary. Pre-doctoral Studentships were awarded to Dr. Fraser from the MRC, the AHFMR and the Savoy Foundation. Post-doctoral Fellowship awards were then obtained from the MRC, AHFMR, NSERC and Epilepsy Canada. He subsequently trained in Paediatrics at Queen’s University, and then he received clinical fellowship training at the University of Ottawa in Critical Care Medicine. Prestigious training research awards were received by Dr. Fraser from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Society for Pediatric Research. Dr. Fraser is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and was awarded a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Fellowship in the Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Program. Dr. Fraser became an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Paediatrics, Physiology & Pharmacology and Clinical Neurological Sciences at Western University in 2003. He was promoted in 2008 to Associate Professor.

Dr. Fraser's research includes epidemiological studies, identification of prognostic disease biomarkers and investigation of cellular mechanisms. Dr. Fraser’s research involves several mouse models of brain injury, collection of biological samples from children with acquired brain injury for laboratory analyses (blood and cerebrospinal fluid) and clinical studies on brain injury pathophysiology and epidemiology. More specifically, he is focused on determining the cellular mechanisms underlying acquired brain injury in trauma, diabetic ketoacidosis and severe sepsis. His current thrust is to determine if/how systemic inflammation causes breakdown of the blood brain barrier and subsequent brain dysfunction. This work includes mouse disease models complemented with use of human tissues for well-controlled in vitro laboratory studies. In parallel, clinical and biomarker experiments are determining the sensitivity and specificity for prognosticating severity of acquired brain injuries. Dr. Fraser is currently supported by grants from the CIHR, HSFO, PSI Foundation, OBI, AMOSO Innovation Fund and Children’s Health Foundation.

Dr. Fraser is Director of the Translational Research Centre (www.translationalresearch.ca).