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Research Awards and Grants

Research

The Developmental Disabilties Program offers 3 different research awards and grants each year.  

See below for details around each award and/or grant.  If you have any questions regarding the submission process, or eligibility requirements, please contact Sarah O'Flanagan, Program Coordinator for Developmental Disabilities by email, or at 519-646-6100  x47694.

Research Awards and Grants

The Greta T. Swart Essay Competition

An annual essay award will be available to an undergraduate medical student or postgraduate medical resident at Western University, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry. The essay should describe an experience managing a patient at any stage in the lifespan with a developmental disability. This includes management of physical health, mental health or both, either in the hospital system or in the community, including family medicine. 


The essay should be 1,500 to 2,000 words in length and typed double spaced with the total word count placed at the top right hand corner of the first page. Entries beyond 2,000 words will not be considered.

The amount of the award is $1,000.  All essays submitted may be published in the Clinical Bulletin of the Developmental Disabilities Program. 

Click here to see the full call for submissions with all the eligibility requirements.  

The application deadline for this award is March 31 of each year.

The Annual Dr. Benjamin Goldberg Research Grant

This is a photograph of Dr. Benjamin Goldberg

Deadline for ProposalsMarch 31

The Developmental Disabilities Program (DDP) is pleased to announce its annual research award intended to provide seed money in grants of $500 to $3,000 to students in order to conduct research of relevance to the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities, thereby helping to improve the lives of individuals with this condition.

Eligibility requirements: The award is open to anyone registered as a student at a community college or university in Southwestern Ontario. However, each applicant must have a collaborator who is a faculty member at Western University who is able to hold the research funds. Examples of fields of study include but are not limited to students or residents in allied health disciplines, Family Medicine, Nursing or Nurse Practitioners, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, or Psychology and may include graduate students in any of these programs or disciplines.

Interested candidates should complete the application package found by clicking here.

The following rating criteria will be used to evaluate each submission:

  1. Relevance to Intellectual Developmental Disabilities (marked out of 5 points) 
  2. Project and Methodology (marked out of 5 points)
  3. Applicant (marked out of 5, includes experience, ability to complete the project, resources, supervision, etc.)

Proposals must be received by March 31 of each year. Applicants who meet the eligibility criteria and whose work is judged to be relevant to the mission of the DDP will be considered for funding support. Recipients will be notified after the review process, and projects will be funded in the same academic year beginning September or sooner if possible. Project completion dates will depend on the project description.

Research grant recipients will be required to submit a summary of their research for publication in the Clinical Bulletin of the Developmental Disabilities Program.

Grant Application Instructions

Your submission should consider the following:

  • Demonstrate how your research proposal relates to the mandate of the Developmental Disabilities Program. The review committee will look to you to be as explicit as possible. 
  • Use clear, concise and simple exposition in your proposal
  • Ensure that your application is in an easy-to-read format:
    • Use an 11 point Arial font and leave 1” margins on all sides.
    • Adhere to stated page maximums. A page refers to a sheet size that's 8½" x 11".

Project Summary

Outline your proposal, stating the objective of the project, and the methods you plan to use.

Relevance Statement

  • Demonstrate how your research proposal relates to the mandate of the Developmental Disabilities Program. It is the responsibility of the applicant to make the relevance of their proposed project explicit.

Project Description 

  • Describe your proposed research project (maximum 4 pages, including references). Note: anything after the fourth page will not be considered in the review of your application.

We recommend that you use the following headings:

  • Background - summarize the state of knowledge relevant to the proposal.
  • Hypotheses/research questions ‑ state these clearly and concisely.
  • Methods - give essential details of methods; describe the data to be collected and the method of data analysis proposed.
  • Originality - state how your project will advance knowledge if completed as planned.
  • Timetable - include a timetable that shows the proportion of time each investigator plans to give to the project.
  • References 

Budget Sheet

Include a budget outlining the proposed use of funds.

Curriculum Vitae

Use the NIH abbreviated CV form with a maximum of 2 pages.  A CV is required from the applicant and their supervisor. The form can be found here. 

Supervisor's Letter

Secure a letter from the supervisor with whom you propose to work that includes the following:

  • an assessment of your scientific abilities and promise as a researcher, explaining what special contribution you will be able to make to the laboratory and what you can expect to gain from working in the supervisor's group;
  • details of the facilities available to you for your proposed study, the laboratory's grant support and the research training planned; and
  • a description of your particular role and responsibilities in the supervisor’s research, including any plans to give you opportunities for independent work.
  • By signing the Facesheet, the supervisor attests to the fact that the application contains a substantial original contribution from the applicant, and that the applicant is responsible for its content.  

Completed applications can be submitted via email to sarah.oflanagan@lhsc.on.ca

The Annual C. Kingsley Allison Research Grant

Deadline for ProposalsOctober 31 of each year

The Developmental Disabilities Program (DDP) is pleased to announce its annual research award intended to provide seed money in grants of up to $9,000 to members of the Western University community in order to conduct research of relevance to the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities, thereby helping to improve the lives of individuals with this condition.

Eligibility requirements: Awards are open to any student (undergraduate or graduate), faculty member or employee of the Western University community. Applications are also invited from non-Western University persons working with agencies in the London region providing services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. In this latter case, a member of the Western University faculty must be listed as a co-investigator and the coordinator of the DDP will facilitate this if necessary. Applications from all departments of the University will be accepted, without preference to any department, school, or faculty within Western University. Value of an award may range up to $9,000, with the actual value of each award being determined by the number of funded proposals and the quality of each proposal. The awards are not limited in scope – rather they are for any and all research projects which are of relevance to the understanding of the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Interested candidates should complete the application package which can be found here.  The following rating criteria will be used to evaluate each submission:

  1. Relevance to Intellectual Developmental Disabilities (marked out of 5 points) 
  2. Project and Methodology (marked out of 5 points)
  3. Applicant (marked out of 5, includes experience, ability to complete the project, resources, supervision, etc.)

Proposals must be received by October 31 of each year. Applicants who meet the eligibility criteria and whose work is judged to be relevant to the mission of the DDP will be considered for funding support. Recipients will be notified after the review process, and projects will be funded in the same academic year beginning September or sooner if possible. Project completion dates will depend on the project description.

Research grant recipients will be required to submit a summary of their research for publication in the Clinical Bulletin of the Developmental Disabilities Program.

Grant Application Instructions

Your submission should consider the following:

  • Demonstrate how your research proposal relates to the mandate of the Developmental Disabilities Program. The review committee will look to you to be as explicit as possible. 
  • Use clear, concise and simple exposition in your proposal
  • Ensure that your application is in an easy-to-read format:
    • Use an 11 point Arial font and leave 1” margins on all sides.
    • Adhere to stated page maximums. A page refers to a sheet size that's 8½" x 11".

 Project Summary

Outline your proposal, stating the objective of the project, and the methods you plan to use.

Relevance Statement

  • Demonstrate how your research proposal relates to the mandate of the Developmental Disabilities Program. It is the responsibility of the applicant to make the relevance of their proposed project explicit.

Project Description

  • Describe your proposed research project (maximum 5 pages, including references). Note: anything after the fourth page will not be considered in the review of your application.

We recommend that you use the following headings:

  • Background - summarize the state of knowledge relevant to the proposal.
  • Hypotheses/research questions ‑ state these clearly and concisely.
  • Methods - give essential details of methods; describe the data to be collected and the method of data analysis proposed.
  • Originality - state how your project will advance knowledge if completed as planned.
  • Timetable - include a timetable that shows the proportion of time each investigator plans to give to the project.
  • References 

Budget Sheet

Include a budget outlining the proposed use of funds.

Curriculum Vitae

Use the NIH abbreviated CV form with a maximum of 2 pages.  A CV is required from the applicant and, where applicable, their supervisor. The form can be found here. (hyperlink)

Supervisor's Letter

When an applicant has a research supervisor, they must secure a letter from the supervisor with whom they propose to work that includes the following:

  1. an assessment of your scientific abilities and promise as a researcher, explaining what special contribution you will be able to make to the laboratory and what you can expect to gain from working in the supervisor's group;
  2. details of the facilities available to you for your proposed study, the laboratory's grant support and the research training planned; and
  3. a description of your particular role and responsibilities in the supervisor’s research, including any plans to give you opportunities for independent work.
  4. By signing the Facesheet, the supervisor attests to the fact that the application contains a substantial original contribution from the applicant, and that the applicant is responsible for its content.