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Faculty Development

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Certificate in Advanced Methods of Teaching (AMT) for Medicine, Dentistry and Basic Medical Sciences

AMT 1 - Preparing to Teach

**Prerequisite: This workshop must be completed prior to attending AMT 2, AMT 3, AMT 4A, AMT 4C or AMT 5.

Participants will be introduced to the teaching portfolio and the components important for promotion and tenure.  They will consider their own evidence-based philosophy that underpins their teaching approach.  They will also identify a pedagogical problem which will be their focal point for the course and drive their learning experience in the AMT.

By the end of the topic participants will be expected to be able to:
   1) identify and approach an appropriate mentor
   2) identify a pedagogical problem in their current teaching context
   3) write an evidence-based teaching philosophy that informs of their approach to teaching

Wednesday, May 2, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. OR
Thursday, May 3, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Health Sciences Addition, room H022 (Lower Ground Floor), Western University
Facilitator: Mark Weyers
Credit Hours:
    MainPro+ up to 3.00
    MainCert Section 1 up to 3.00

Register now

AMT 2 - Advanced Small Group Teaching

**Prerequisite: Participants must attend AMT 1 prior to attending this workshop.

Using Learning Outcomes to Plan and Design Interactive Learning Sessions
Participants will be introduced to a Model of Planning (MOP) that uses learning outcomes to plan strategically, facilitate active engagement and cut planning time by up to 50%. This method has been taught to university faculty in Canada, the UK and across Europe. Participants will learn how to write learning outcomes that can be used to frame effective questions and engaging group discussions and increase higher level thinking (i.e. problem-solving; critical thinking).  

The topic will culminate with participants presenting course artifacts (e.g. learning activities) that they have designed during this topic.

By the end of this topic participants will be expected to be able to:
   1) use effective questioning techniques to engage students in higher level thinking
   2) employ strategies for effective group discussions
   3) plan an effective small group session for active student engagement
   4) design learning activities to engage students in higher level thinking
   5) identify and implement a variety of learning activities for different purposes and assessment goals

Wednesdays, May 9, 16 and 23, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. OR
Thursdays, May 10, 17 and 24, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Health Sciences Addition, room H022 (Lower Ground Floor), Western University
Facilitator: Mark Weyers
Credit Hours:
    MainPro+ up to 8.25
    MainCert Section 1 up to 8.25 and Section 3 up to 0.50

Register now

AMT 3 - Methods of Assessment

**Prerequisite: Participants must attend AMT 1 and AMT 2 prior to attending this workshop.

Using Learning Outcomes to Design Assessment Tasks and Assessment Rubrics
Participants will discuss the purposes of assessment and consider how variety and innovation in assessment can enhance learning.  Participants will also learn how to use learning outcomes to design assessment briefs and assessment rubrics aligned to course learning and how to provide effective formative assessment (descriptive feedback) to foster higher order learning.  

The topic will culminate with participants presenting course artifacts (e.g. assessment task and rubrics) that they have designed during this topic.

By the end of this topic, participants will be expected to be able to:
   1) design and write an assessment task aligned to their course learning outcomes
   2) design and write an assessment rubric aligned to their course learning outcomes and an assessment task
   3) problematize the impact of assessment on student learning and engagement
   4) design an appropriate formative assessment strategy to enhance student learning

Wednesdays, May 30 and June 6, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. OR
Thursdays, May 31 and June 7, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Health Sciences Addition, room H022 (Lower Ground Floor), Western University
Facilitator: Mark Weyers
Credit Hours:
    MainPro+ up to 6.00
    MainCert Section 1 up to 5.50 and Section 3 up to 0.50

Register now

AMT 4A - Clinical Teaching for Medicine

This topic is for clinicians who teach learners of all stages - from medical students to fellows, across all clinical settings - and is organized around 6 subtopics: learning climate; control of session; communication of goals; promoting understanding and retention; evaluation; and feedback.

This topic aims to enhance the physician’s teaching toolbox by exploring new teaching behaviors that can be applied to and implemented in day-to-day teaching moments.

By the end of this topic participants will be expected to be able to:
   1) create a stimulating learning climate that encourages learner involvement, promotes respect and comfort, and fosters the admission of limitations
   2) control a teaching session by focusing a topic and pacing it effectively
   3) communicate teaching goals through the establishment, expression and collaboration of goals
   4) promote understanding and retention through the organization of material presented, use of clarity and emphasis, and by fostering active learning
   5) evaluate the learner by observing, by questioning, and by assessing self-assessment.
   6) provide effective feedback by incorporating minimal feedback, behavioral feedback, and interactive feedback

Facilitator: Josee Paradis
Credit Hours:
    MainPro+ up to 8.50
    MainCert Section 1 up to 5.50 and Section 3 up to 3.00

Register now

AMT 4C - Advanced Student Engagement Strategies

**Prerequisite: Participants must attend AMT 1, AMT 2, and AMT 3 prior to attending this workshop.

This topic for Clinical Academics and Basic Medical Sciences faculty is hands-on and interactive, and offers tips on how to deliver an effective lecture. Participants will learn techniques to make the best use of voice and body language to deliver more interactive sessions that capture and hold students’ interest. The workshop also covers how to incorporate humour, metaphor and story-telling techniques to enhance lectures.

By the end of this topic, participants will be expected to be able to:
   1) effectively plan a large group lecture
   2) build metaphor, humour and story-telling techniques into a lecture
   3) implement strategies for engaging larger groups in active learning

Wednesdays, June 13 and 20, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. OR
Thursdays, June 14 and 21, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Health Sciences Addition, room H022 (Lower Ground Floor), Western University
Facilitator: Mark Weyers
Credit Hours:
    MainPro+ up to 6.00
    MainCert Section 1 up to 5.50 and Section 3 up to 0.50

Register now

Webinars

Canadian Association for Medical Education (CAME) 2018 Webinar Series

CAME webinars brings practical, evidence- and experience-based advice to Canadian health educators, and offer opportunities to engage with experts and colleagues in live, online discussions on medical education topics.

The aims of the webinar series are to enable Canadian health educators to:
- list contemporary challenges and solutions in health education, and
- consider how these solutions may be useful in their education/teaching activities.

Webinars will be offered at 12:00pm EST and 12:00pm PST (3:00pm EST).

Click here for upcoming webinar dates, topics and to register online.

Teaching Foundations

A Workshop for Small Group (PCCIA) Facilitators

Small groups offer excellent opportunities for students to learn, but how can this be facilitated by faculty?

In the Schulich Medicine program, small groups of students meet weekly with a facilitator to foster independent learning skills regarding patient scenarios. PCCIA (Patient-Centred Context: Integration & Application) and expert tutorials both employ small groups.

In this PCCIA-focused workshop, participants will examine the goals and objectives of small group learning, the role of the facilitator, group process, peer assessment, and evaluation of student performance. Participants will also have an opportunity to work with an experienced facilitator following the workshop.

Facilitator: Herschel Rosenberg

Approaches to Flipping Your Classroom

This is an engaging, interactive workshop about the application of the flipped classroom. Participants will be able to experience the flipped classroom from a student’s point of view, will learn the pedagogy and rationale behind the use of the flipped classroom for classes large and small, and will learn about simple tools that can be used in flipped classroom development.

This workshop will be videoconferenced from London to Windsor. Please choose the location most convenient for you.

Facilitators: Derek McLachlin, Sarah McLean, Tim Wilson

Professionalism: Encouraging Exemplary Behaviour and Remediating Lapses

Many faculty have described concerns about learners’ attitudes or comportment in clinical settings. They aren’t always comfortable in addressing lapses in professional behaviour, especially with limited exposure to individual learners. Drawing on real-life scenarios, this workshop will offer participants an opportunity to describe challenges in providing feedback and in holding learners accountable. It will also offer participants the opportunity to learn new ways to promote professional behaviour, to coach learners whose behaviour has been problematic, and to mentor other faculty facing similar challenges.

After this workshop, participants will be expected to be able to:
   - describe three approaches to professionalism
   - describe methods for assessing professional behaviours and providing effective feedback
   - describe an approach for remediating lapses in professional behaviour

Facilitators: George Kim, Barbara Lent, Wayne Weston

Leadership & Management

Conflict Resolution: Skills & Processes

In this intensive one-day workshop, learn how to reduce stress and the risk of escalating, and how to work with others to reach agreement from differing positions. Choose an appropriate approach to dealing with conflict and learn a collaborative conflict resolution model. The skills and approaches presented will allow you to advance your interests without harm to key relationships, enhance buy-in, lower resistance, and use your time to create optimal outcomes. This workshop is a prerequisite for Principled Negotiation.

Facilitator: Janine Higgins

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional and social intelligence determines how we leverage IQ into success in life and work. Participants will learn to accurately recognize, attend to and understand emotion; manage, control and appropriately express emotions, and appreciate the affect and influence of emotions on decision-making, achievement and influence on others. You can’t change your IQ but you can increase your Emotional Quotient (EQ) with understanding and attention.

Facilitator: Janine Higgins

Principled Negotiation

This workshop introduces a structured approach to negotiation allowing you to meet your needs and reduce resistance in others. Learn the key ingredients that optimize results, and learn how to avoid the biggest negotiating mistake. This course builds on skills and concepts covered in Conflict Resolution. Participants must have previously taken the Conflict Resolution: Skills and Processes workshop before attending this workshop.

Facilitator: Janine Higgins

Mentorship

Implementing a Schulich Faculty Mentorship Program in Your Department

Why mentorship? Institutions with supportive cultures thrive: new faculty benefit from experienced input, senior faculty benefit from junior faculty perspective, and the institution benefits from increased productivity.

This workshop will be of interest to any clinical faculty member who has not yet achieved career rank and/or tenure or who has a change in their academic role (ARC), as well as clinical faculty members at any rank who are interested in a mentorship committee.

This workshop will provide training for both mentors and mentees who participate on a formal Schulich mentorship committee.

Facilitators: Doug Jones, Laura Foxcroft

Mentoring a Learner in Difficulty

Within this workshop participants will learn to define the different types of learners based on indicators such as attitude, knowledge, behaviour and life events. Participants will also be educated in approaches to managing the learner in difficulty and the importance of documentation of problems and attempts at management. Participants will gain an understanding of the departmental, Faculty and University process along with how to identify intervention and escalation strategies.

Facilitator: Terri Paul

Principles and Practices of Being a Mentor

This interactive workshop has been developed for basic science faculty, dentistry faculty and clinical faculty to discuss the principles and practices of being an effective mentor. The purpose of the workshop is to learn “best practices” on how to establish and maintain an effective mentoring relationship. Video examples of mentoring sessions will be provided to demonstrate and discuss the practise of mentoring.

Career Development

How to Get Promoted: For UWOFA Members and Affiliated Institute Scientists

Whether you are up for promotion next year or in five years, to be successful it is important to be aware of University requirements for promotion, tenure or the granting of sequential term appointments. UWOFA members, including basic scientists in clinical departments and affiliated Institute scientists, can benefit from this practical workshop, which will also provide guidance on preparing teaching dossiers, promotion and tenure dossiers, and presenting your case.

How to Get Promoted: For Clinical Academics at the Assistant Professor Rank

Whether you are up for promotion next year or in five years, in order to be successful, it is important to be aware of the University requirements for promotion and the granting of continuing appointments. Clinical academics in both the Senate and Provost streams can benefit from this practical workshop, which will provide guidance on preparing teaching dossiers, promoting dossiers, and presenting your case.

Should I Get Promoted? For Clinical Academics at the Associate Professor Rank

Whether you are up for promotion next year or in five years, in order to be successful, it is important to be aware of the University requirements for promotion and the granting of continuing appointments. Clinical academics in both the Senate and Provost streams can benefit from this practical workshop, which will provide guidance on preparing teaching dossiers, promoting dossiers, and presenting your case.

How to Hold an Effective Career Development (CDP) Planning Meeting

In 2012, London Health Sciences Centre, St. Joseph’s Health Care London and the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry launched a talent management program for clinical academics.

The program provides a framework which:
- supports mentorship and leadership skills development,
- identifies potential future leaders who may move from foundational leadership capabilities to more advanced leadership roles, and
- establishes a means to evaluate and advance leadership abilities through a modified LEADS framework.

As part of the talent management program, all clinical academics are evaluated annually through the Career Development Planning (CDP) process.

This workshop will:
- describe the CDP process and demonstrate the CDP form,
- provide answers to frequently asked questions, and
- outline the general principles of conducting a CDP interview.

The workshop will use a multi-media format and will be highly interactive.

Communications

Assert Yourself

Assertiveness does not mean getting your point across at the expense of others, nor compromising your principles to placate others. Rather, assertiveness is clear, respectful communication. An assertive person handles potentially stressful situations by design rather than by default. This course will identify the differences between passive, aggressive, and assertive approaches, and teaches assertive language behaviours. Participants will have opportunities to practise assertiveness, and consider how to use assertiveness skills in their work and personal circumstances. Assertiveness skills will draw better responses from others and allow you to be less stressed, more positive, more creative, and better able to get your job done more effectively.

Facilitator: Janine Higgins

Speak So Others Listen

A three-session practical presentation skills workshop designed to develop additional confidence in your communication skills. Learn and practise strategies for giving both prepared and extemporaneous speeches. Master how to introduce yourself in networking settings and how to control nervousness. The enrolment maximum is set to 10 to allow participants to have plenty of time to speak and receive feedback.

Facilitators: "Campus Communicators" Jimmy Chien, Donna Moore, Lance Mercer

Technology

OWL Learning Management System (LMS) at Western

For complete information about the OWL online learning management system (LMS) at Western, as well as how to use OWL and where to find support, visit Western's eLearning Toolkit.

For one-on-one or in-person OWL support, contact the Instructional Technology Resource Centre (ITRC).

By Request Training
Time spent in one-on-one training is not eligible for group learning CME credits. There may be alternative ways for individual participants to obtain credits through their respective college:

Members of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada may be eligible to earn credits by completing a “Personal Learning Project” under the “Section 2: Self-learning” category of the Maintenance of Certification Program Framework. Click for more information

Members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada may be eligible to earn Mainpro+ credits by completing a “Linking Learning” exercise. Click for more information