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Graduate Course Information

Information on this page last updated August 7, 2017.

Beginning August 4, Medical Biophysics graduate students will be able to enroll in Fall Term courses on-line through their Student Centres. 


Please Note:
All courses with the suffix 'A' are half courses offered in Fall Term 2016.
All course with the suffix 'B' are half courses offered in Winter Term 2017.
All courses with the suffix 'Y' are half courses which may be offered over two academic terms.
All courses with no suffix (e.g. Biophysics 9513, 9670, and 9700) are full courses offered over 2 terms.
Half courses have an academic credit of 0.5.
Full courses have an academic credit of 1.0.



For Fall Term 2017 Course Listings, click
HERE.

For Winter Term 2018 Course Listings, click HERE



Important Notes About Physics 9660A: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Biophysics 9650A: Conceptual MRI; Biophysics 9665A: Advanced MRI Physics; and Biophysics 9662B: MRI Physics

Students who are performing research on Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (e.g. students developing a new pulse sequence, creating a new image reconstruction method, designing new MR hardware like a gradient or a coil array) would ordinarily take Physics 9660A followed by Biophysics 9662B. These courses are designed to give students a detailed understanding of the fundamental physics underpinning MRI/MRS. Students taking this course would be expected to have taken physics and mathematics course at the undergraduate level.

Students who are using MRI and/or MRS as a tool to answer a research question (e.g. performing MRI of an animal model of cancer), but not developing MRI/MRS techniques, would ordinarily tale Biophysics 9650A. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of MRI so that students using MRI will have a solid understanding of the technology. This course covers a similar set of material as Physics 9660A and Biophysics 9662B, but does so in less depth and in a compressed time frame. Students taking this course are not expected to have taken physics and mathematics course at the undergraduate level.

Students who wish to gain exposure to a wide variety of advanced topics in MRI/MRS can consider taking Biophysics 9665A. This course is intended to give brief introductions to many "hot topics" in modern MRI/MRS research and should give students a good overview of the current state of the art in the field. This course should only be attempted by students that have successfully completed Physics 9660A and Biophysics 9662B.


Fall Term 2017 Graduate Courses

September 30th, 2017
Last day to enrol in fall term graduate courses, declare an audit for a course, or drop a graduate course without it appearing on the transcript.

October 31st, 2017
Last day to withdraw from a graduate course beginning in the term without academic penalty.

Important Notes For Graduate Students About On-line Self Enrollment Through Their Student Centres

Your course registration for all Biophysics graduate courses MUST be done on-line through your Student Centre.

You MUST enroll on-line in the second term of any full course (e.g. Biophysics 9513 Scientific Communications, Biophysics 9700 Graduate Seminars, Biophysics 9670 Nuclear Medicine Physics etc.) in which you were enrolled for academic credit at the start of Fall Term 2016.

For SGPS general course regulations, click HERE.

For SGPS forms re: enrollment in graduate courses and graduate enrollment in undergraduate courses, click HERE.

It is the responsibility of all Medical Biophysics graduate students to be aware of the information provided on the above links and to adhere to all deadlines associated with the information posted on these links.

BIOPHYSICS 9513: Scientific Communications - Compulsory Full Course

Scientific Communications is compulsory for all 1st year Medical Biophysics graduate students.

See course outline for class schedule.

ALL students who enroll in this course in Fall 2016 MUST also enroll on-line through their Student Centre for the second term (Winter 2017) in order to receive academic credit (i.e. final grade on transcript).

It involves practical work in oral and written communication related to the student's research. Students are required to participate in a two and ten minute oral presentation on his or her research project. Poster presentations, abstract writing, preparation of writing a paper, grant applications and an overview of ethics, authorship and data representation are also covered. Students are encouraged to take a minimal number of additional courses to supplement their background. With the help of their supervisor, graduate students' courses will be individually selected to contribute to thier background knowledge and research project. Graduate students are also required to present one departmental seminar per year.

Instructors: Drs. Terry Thompson and Matt Teeter

BIOPHYSICS 9700: Graduate Seminars - Compulsory Full Course

ALL students who enroll in this course for Fall 2016 MUST also enroll on-line through their Student Centre for the second term (Winter Term 2017) in order to receive academic credit (i.e. final grade on transcript).

Biophysics 9700 Graduate Seminars is a compulsory course in which all Medical Biophysics graduate students must enroll during each year of their studies.

Strong oral presentation skills are necessary for success in academia, industry and the public sector. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to practice their oral presentation and chairing skills via a conference-style venue and to provide a forum for discussion of research.

View the 2017 - 2018 Graduate Seminar Speakers' Schedule HERE.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Aaron Ward

BIOPHYSICS 9509A: Introduction to Digital Image Processing

See course outline for class schedule.

This introductory course provides a solid background in the fundamentals of digital image processing, and covers many of the major topics in the field, including image representation, 2D linear systems theory and Fourier analysis, digital filtering, registration and segmentation. The course concentrates on those techniques that have proven most useful in practice. A major aim of this course is to expose students to real-world applications of image processing in industry, science and medicine. Through assignments,students will become familiar with the image processing facilities available in the popular MATLAB numeric computation and visualization environment.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Hanif Ladak

BIOPHYSICS 9510A: Hemodynamics

See course outline for class schedule.

This course focuses on delivering an understanding of the fundamentals of steady and pulsatile blood flow in tubes and blood vessels. We will introduce hemodynamic models and the role of non-dimensional parameters. We also focus on the measurement of pressure, flow velocity and distribution as well as the characteristics of flow in large and small blood vessels: geometric factors, measurement techniques and physical alteration of flow by disease.

Course Co-ordinatorDr. Dan Goldman

BIOPHYSICS 9515A: Introduction to Medical Imaging

See course outline for class schedule.

Through this introductory course the student will learn the physics and methods of how medical images are formed. By the end of the term the student will understand how images are formed for the following different imaging modalities: ultrasound, x-rays, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, positron-emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. To understand the tomographic imaging modalities, the student will also gain knowledge of the Fourier Transform and its applications in medical imaging. A basic understanding of the sources of noise and artifacts in the different modalities will also be attained, along with an understanding of the limits to the achievable resolution.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Maria Drangova

BIOPHYSICS 9530A: Human Biomechanics with Biomedical Applications

See course outline for class schedule.

The mechanical properties of biological structures and fluids in relation to function: deformability, strength, and visco-elasticity of hard and soft tissues, modes of loading and failure. Special topics include mechanics of synovial joints, mechanics of hearing, and mechanics of orthopedic implants and joint replacement.

Course Co-ordinatorDr. Abbas Samani

Biophysics 9603A/B: Research Ethics and Biostatistics

This on-line course is offered in both Fall and Winter Terms of each academic year.

The purpose of this course is to provide a summary for trainees about the important guidelines and requirements related to research ethics, the basics of setting up and running pre-clinical and clinical trials, including two modules on basic biostatistics. This is not a heavily theoretical course where participants must learn and memorize facts and theories, but rather is a road map highlighting issues they need to be aware of, and where they will find information to guide them.

Course Co-ordinator: Jackie Williams

Biophysics 9650A: Conceptual MRI

See course outline for class schedule.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the conceptual underpinnings of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This course will focus on the concepts needed to interpret MR images and design MRI experiments. It is intended for graduate students that will be using MR images in their thesis work, as opposed to students needing an in-depth knowledge of MR physics. Those students should consider BIOPHYS 9662/9663 instead.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Charles McKenzie

Biophysics 9665A: Advanced MRI Physics

See course outline for class schedule.

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of advanced magnetic resonance pulse sequences and specialized methods used in current clinical and research settings. This course will assume an understanding of the concepts covered in BIOPHYS 9663 and 9662.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Jean Theberge

BIOPHYSICS 9670: Nuclear Medicine Physics

This course is scheduled every second year. It will not be offered again until Fall Term 2017.

This course covers the concepts and instrumentation associated with clinical nuclear medicine physics. Topics include: atomic and nuclear physics and modes of decay, interaction of radiation and matter, production of radionuclides, radiation detectors and instrumentation, spectrometry and radiation counting, principles of gamma cameras, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron emission Tomography (PET), Radiation Safety Practice and Regulations, Tracer Kinetic Modeling, and Internal Radiation Dosimetry. The course is enriched by guest lectures covering medical cyclotrons and other imaging modalities complementary to Nuclear Medicine. 

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Rob Stodilka

Biophysics 9704A: Problem Discovery and Problem Solving

See course outline for class schedule.

Discovering research problems whose solutions will have high impact is fundamental to both academic and non-academic research. This course will provide the students with a diverse set of tools to aid the student from discovery of a problem to a problem solution, using process skills developed and validated in cognitive science literature. The skills developed in this course will be linked directly to current challenges faced by graduate students and in their future careers in academia and industry.

  • Course Outline (PDF, 128KB)

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Ali Khan

Winter Term 2017 Graduate Courses

January 31, 2017
Last day to enrol in graduate courses starting in the winter term. Students who are not enrolled by this date cannot receive academic credit for the winter term.

Last day to declare an audit for a course starting in the winter term.

Last day to drop a graduate course beginning in the winter term without it appearing on the transcript. Students who drop after this date but before March 1 will receive a WDN on their transcript.

February 28, 2017
Last day to withdraw from a graduate course beginning in the winter term without academic penalty. Students who drop after this date will receive an F on their transcript.

Important Notes For Graduate Students About On-line Self Enrollment Through Their Student Centres

Your course registration for all Biophysics graduate courses MUST be done on-line through your Student Centre.

You MUST enroll on-line in the second term of any full course (e.g. Biophysics 9513 Scientific Communications, Biophysics 9700 Graduate Seminars, Biophysics 9670 Nuclear Medcine Physics etc.) in which you were enrolled for academic credit at the start of Fall Term 2016.

BIOPHYSICS 9513: Scientific Communications - Compulsory Full Course

See course outline for class schedule.

ALL students who enroll in this course in Fall 2016 MUST also enroll on-line through their Student Centre for the second term (Winter 2017) in order to receive academic credit (i.e. final grade on transcript).

Scientific Communications is compulsory for all 1st year Medical Biophysics graduate students.

It involves practical work in oral and written communication related to the student's research. Students are required to participate in a two and ten minute oral presentation on his or her research project. Poster presentations, abstract writing, preparation of writing a paper, grant applications and an overview of ethics, authorship and data representation are also covered. Students are encouraged to take a minimal number of additional courses to supplement their background. With the help of their supervisor, graduate students' courses will be individually selected to contribute to thier background knowledge and research project. Graduate students are also required to present one departmental seminar per year.

Instructors: Drs. Terry Thompson and Matt Teeter

BIOPHYSICS 9700: Graduate Seminars - Compulsory Full Course

ALL students who enroll in this course for Fall 2016 MUST also enroll on-line through their Student Centre for the second term (Winter Term 2017) in order to receive academic credit (i.e. final grade on transcript).

Biophysics 9700 Graduate Seminars is a compulsory course in which all Medical Biophysics graduate students must enroll during each year of their studies.

Strong oral presentation skills are necessary for success in academia, industry and the public sector. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to practice their oral presentation and chairing skills via a conference-style venue and to provide a forum for discussion of research.

View the 2016 - 2017 Graduate Seminar Speakers' Schedule HERE.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Aaron Ward

BIOPHYSICS 9516Y: Advanced Imaging Principles

NOT OFFERED IN WINTER TERM 2017. 

Medical imaging plays a critical role in modern medicine. Images are used for visualization of lesions, segmentation, region of interest measurements, and many other purposes. This course describes how and why poor image quality (spatial resolution and image noise) can make it difficult to see lesions or make quantitative measurements from medical images, and how to minimize these errors (eg. determine the necessary region of interest size to accurately determine average pixel value). Results are applicable to all imaging modalities, and examples are given for digital radiography, MRI, CT, and ultrasound. A strong emphasis is placed on the effective use of linear-systems theory and the Fourier transform to describe both signal and noise.

  • Course Outline (PDF, 70KB)

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Ian Cunningham

BIOPHYSICS 9518B: Molecular Imaging

See course outline for class schedule. If class schedule is not included, please contact course co-ordinator for missing details.

This course focuses on an introduction to the role of diagnostic imaging in detecting molecules, genes, and cells in vivo. Emphasis will be in how these techniques can help study molecular mechanisms of disease in vivo. Topics include DNA/protein synthesis, transgenic mice, novel contrast agents and small animal imaging.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Savita Dhanvantari

BIOPHYSICS 9519B: Advanced Image Processing

See course outline for class schedule. If class schedule is not included, please contact course co-ordinator for missing details.

Digital image processing has various applications ranging from remote sensing and entertainment to medical applications. This course explores a few major areas of digital image processing at an advanced level, with primary emphasis on medical applications. Topics covered include image segmentation, image registration, validation of image processing algorithms, and image processing using 3D Slicer and the Insight Toolkit (ITK). Examples will be presented to give the students exposure to real-world applications.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Elvis Chen

BIOPHYSICS 9520B: Practical Medical Imaging - NOT OFFERED**

See course outline for class schedule. If class schedule is not included, please contact course co-ordinator for missing details.

Portable and programmable imaging systems that can be run at user’s desktop form an important bridge between theoretical knowledge gained from imaging physics courses to real-world applications involving clinical imaging systems. The primary learning outcome of this course is to provide students with practical, hands-on experience in computed tomography, magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging modalities using desktop imaging systems. Students will gain valuable experience in the practical aspects of operation, image acquisition and data analysis during the completion of incrementally challenging and interesting in-class laboratory assignments.

  • Course Outline (PDF, 99KB)

Course Co-ordinators: Drs. Tim Scholl and Aaron So

BIOPHYSICS 9522B: Inferencing from Data Analysis

See course outline for class schedule. If class schedule is not included, please contact course co-ordinator for missing details.

This course covers most statistical procedures used in experimental research.  Data analysis will be conducted using SPSS for Windows. Topics covered include the t-test, various forms of analysis of variance, bivariate correlation, simple and multiple regression, factor analysis, and multivariate analysis of variance to name a few. Students will become familiar with reporting research findings and writing a result section for a scientific manuscript.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Yves Bureau

BIOPHYSICS 9567B: Radiation Biology Applications

This web-based course consists of lecture slides with dubbed audio, 4 assignments, a mid-term exam of 2 hours, and a final exam of 3 hours. Opportunity for “live” interaction with the Instructor and Teaching Assistant will be provided in the form of scheduled tutorials. This course covers essential material for students in CAMPEP-accredited Medical Physics programs at the graduate or postgraduate residency levels. It is also required by medical postgraduate residency programs in radiation oncology and diagnostic imaging, including nuclear medicine.

The course describes the effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms, from cells to animals. The lectures begin with a brief physical description of the various types of ionizing radiation, the electromagnetic spectrum, and how radiation interacts with atoms. The early physical events produce ionizations and yield chemical radicals that can damage important biological molecules such as water and DNA, leading to either cellular repair or death. The course emphasizes radiation damage to cells and organs, with practical illustrations of applications to cancer therapy. It also reviews the risk-benefit rationale used in government regulations for the controlled use of radiation in research and medicine.

  • Course Outline (PDF, 58.5KB)

Instructor: Drs. Scott Karnas & Hatim Fakir

BIOPHYSICS 9603A/B Research Ethics and Biostatistics - NOT OFFERED**

Please Note: This course is formally known as Vascular Program 9603A/B

This on-line course is offered in both Fall and Winter Terms of each academic year.

The purpose of this course is to provide a summary for trainees about the important guidelines and requirements related to research ethics, the basics of setting up and running pre-clinical and clinical trials, including two modules on basic biostatistics. This is not a heavily theoretical course where participants must learn and memorize facts and theories, but rather is a road map highlighting issues they need to be aware of, and where they will find information to guide them.

Course Co-ordinator: Jackie Williams

BIOPHYSICS 9663B: MRI Physics - NOT Offered Winter 2018

See course outline for class schedule. If class schedule is not included, please contact course co-ordinator for missing details.

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the principles of magnetic resonance imaging. This course will extend the concepts covered in Physics 9660A: Nuclear Magentic Resonance. The course will focus on the concepts of spatial data encoding (k-­‐space),selective excitation (radio-­‐frequency pulses), image contrast, and image signal to noise ratio. Students will be introduced to various MRI pulse sequences and gain a thorough understanding of the elements required for image formation and the generation of image artefacts. This course serves as the pre-­‐requisite to the advanced graduate magnetic resonance imaging course in Medical Biophysics: Advanced MRI Physics.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Rob Bartha

BIOPHYSICS 9670: Nuclear Medicine Physics (2nd term - full course)

This course covers the concepts and instrumentation associated with clinical nuclear medicine physics. Topics include: atomic and nuclear physics and modes of decay, interaction of radiation and matter, production of radionuclides, radiation detectors and instrumentation, spectrometry and radiation counting, principles of gamma cameras, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron emission Tomography (PET), Radiation Safety Practice and Regulations, Tracer Kinetic Modeling, and Internal Radiation Dosimetry. The course is enriched by guest lectures covering medical cyclotrons and other imaging modalities complementary to Nuclear Medicine. 

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Rob Stodilka

BIOPHYSICS 9672: Practical Radiotherapy Physics (1st term - full course)

See course outline for class schedule. If class schedule is not included, please contact course co-ordinator for missing details.

This course is designed to provide trainees with a strong background and training in practical medical physics as this relates to radiation therapy physics.

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Kathleen Surry

BIOPHYSICS 9674B: Pedagogy in Biophysics *Not Offered this year*

See course outline for class schedule. If class schedule is not included, please contact course co-ordinator for missing details.

In this course, students will develop a formal understanding of pedagogical concepts underlying high quality science curriculum design and delivery at the university level. This understanding will be developed through in-class discussion based coverage of canonical and current research articles in the pedagogy literature, and an application of the learned concepts to the development of a graduate-level course curriculum.

  • Course Outline (PDF, 27KB)

Course Co-ordinatorDr. Aaron Ward