Schulich school of Medicine and Dentistry logo Department of Biochemistry Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry

Course Information

 Biochemistry 2280A - Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

An introduction to biochemistry with emphasis on protein structure and function, intermediary metabolism and nucleic acid structure and function.

Lectures: MWF 2:30 - 3:30 | TTF 3:30 - 4:30 pm

Antirequisite(s): Biochemistry 2288A.

Prerequisite(s): Either Biology 1001A or 1201A and (either Biology 1002B or 1202B) and Chemistry 1301A/B and 1302A/B. Integrated Science 1001X can be used in place of Bio 1002B and Chem 1302A/B.

Course Manager: Dr. Chris Brandl
Instructors: Dr. Michael Boffa, Dr. Derek McLachlin

Evaluation: There is an assignment worth 10%, a midterm test worth 40% and a final exam worth 50%.

Instructional Information:
  • Textbook: Essential Cell Biology Fourth Edition - Bruce Alberts, Dennis Bray, Karen Hopkin, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter. Garland Publishing Inc.
  • Course Package: May be purchased at the Bookstore at a cost of ~$26.00. This package includes supplemental notes, topic review questions (with answers), practice exam questions (with answers) for the midterm and final, and the Genome 3 readings.

Distance Studies Biochemistry 2280A - Summer 2017 - May 8th to July 30th

An introduction to biochemistry with emphasis on protein structure and function, intermediary metabolism and nucleic acid structure and function. Have a look at the course syllabus.

Antirequisite(s): Biochemistry 2288A.

Prerequisite(s): Either Biology 1001A or 1201A and either Biology 1002B or 1202B; Chemistry 1301A/B and 1302A/B, or the former Chemistry 1100A/B and 1200B.

Note: It is recommended that a course in organic chemistry be taken previously or concurrently (e.g. Chemistry 2213A/B or 2273A).

Textbook: Essential Cell Biology Fourth Edition - Bruce Alberts, Dennis Bray, Karen Hopkin, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter. Garland Publishing Inc.

Details for registration are at Western's Office of the Registrar - Distance Studies.

Biochemistry 2288A - Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for Foods and Nutrition

An introduction to biochemistry with emphasis on protein structure and function, intermediary metabolism and nucleic acid structure and function.

Lectures: MWF 2:30 - 3:30 | TTF 3:30 - 4:30

Antirequisite(s): Biochemistry 2280A.

Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 1301A/B and 1302A/B, and Biology 1290B, and registration in senior years of a Foods and Nutrition module.

Course Manager: Dr. Chris Brandl
Instructors: Dr. Michael Boffa, Dr. Derek McLachlin

Evaluation: There are 3 assignments worth 10% each, a midterm test worth 33% and final exam worth 37%.

Instructional Information:

  • Textbook: Essential Cell Biology Fourth Edition - Bruce Alberts, Dennis Bray, Karen Hopkin, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter. Garland Publishing Inc.
  • Course Package: May be purchased from the Bookstore at a cost of ~$26.00. This package includes supplemental notes, topic review questions (with answers), practice exam questions (with answers) for the midterm and final, and the Genome 3 readings.

Biochemistry 3380G - Biochemistry Laboratory

This course consists of a series of laboratory exercises designed to familiarize the student with the basic methods in biochemistry and molecular biology, and to demonstrate concepts taught in biochemistry lecture courses. Students will learn how to present their results in an acceptable scientific format.

Lectures: Th 1:30 - 5:30 | Fri 1:30 - 5:30

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 3381A and 3382A.

Pre-or Corequisite(s):

Instructor: Dr. Derek McLachlin

Evaluation:

  • 50% - 4 written submissions
  • 10% - 5 assignments
  • 10% - professionalism and performance
  • 30% - final exam

Instructional information: The lab manual will be available for $15 in MBL C5 in early January. Students will be doing lab work during the first session, so please bring safety glasses and a lab coat to the first session. Assignment #1 is based on work done during the first session.

Biochemistry 3381A - Biological Macromolecules

A consideration of the structure of proteins and nucleic acids; enzymology; elements of recombinant DNA technology and related methodology.

Lectures: MWF 12:30 - 1:30
Tutorials: Wed 5:30 - 6:30

Prerequisite(s): Either Biochemistry 2280A or 2288A with a mark of at least 60%; either Chemistry 2213A/B  or 2273A: and a minimum mark of 60% in either Chemistry 2223B or 2283G.

Course Manager: Dr. M. Junop
Instructors: Dr. D. W. Litchfield, Dr. B. ShiltonDr. S. Dunn

Evaluation: The course is divided into three independent units, each tested on one examination. The course mark will be determined by weighting the mark in each unit proportionally to the number of lectures in that unit, i.e. Nucleic Acids (31%),  Proteins (36%), and Enzymes (33%). Unit marks will be based largely (normally 90%) on the examinations. Problem sets or assignments may contribute a small percentage to the mark for each unit; each professor will provide details. Problem sets and assignments must be completed independently, submitted on time and may not be copied from any source.

Instructional Information: Required textbook, Biochemistry, first Canadian edition, by Garrett, R. H., Grisham, C. M. Andreopoulos, S., Willmore, W.G., and Gallouzi, I.E.

Biochemistry 3382A - Biochemical Regulation

Among the topics discussed will be principles of metabolic control, mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation of DNA replication, regulation of gene expression, and epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation.

Lectures: Tu Th 10:30 - 11:30  F 2:30 - 3:30

Prerequisite(s): A minimum mark of 65% in either Biochemistry 2280A or 2288A; a minimum mark of 60% either in Chemistry 2213A/B or 2273A and a minimum mark of 60% in either Chemistry 2223B or 2283G.

Course Manager: Dr. David Edgell
Instructors: Dr. B. Karas, Dr. Ilka Heinemann, Dr. Derek McLachlin

Evaluation:

The course is divided into three independent units each unit taught by one professor. The course mark will be determined by weighting the mark in each unit proportionally to the number of lectures in that unit (ie. 40% for section 1, 20% for section 2 and 40% for section 3). Problem sets or assignments may contribute a small percentage to the mark for each section; each professor will provide details. Problem sets and assignments must be completed independently and submitted on time (late assignments will not be accepted).

Examinations: There are two MIDTERM TESTS - one worth 40% of mark and one worth 20%. FINAL EXAM worth 40% of mark.

Instructional Information:

  • Biochemistry, first Canadian edition, by Garrett, R.H., Grisham, C.M., Andreopoulos, S., Willmore, W.G., and Callouzi, I.E.
  • Molecular biology Principles and Practice, 1st Edition, Cox, Doudna,O'Donnell, W.H. Freeman.
  • Online Resources: Cell Signalling Biology, (www.biochemj.org/csb)

Biochemistry 3383F/G - Introduction to Biochemical Research

Students carry out a research project under the direction of a faculty member, gaining practical experience in a biochemistry research laboratory. Experimental design, critical thinking, and scientific communication will be emphasized, and students will develop skills at reading and reviewing primary scientific literature.

Lectures: No Lectures

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 3381A and 3382A are co- or prerequisites

Participating Faculty: Dr. Eric Ball, Dr. Chris Brandl, Dr. James Choy, Dr. Fred Dick, Dr. Gabriel DiMattia, Dr. Stanley Dunn, Dr. David Edgell, Dr. David Haniford, Dr. Ilka Heinemann, Dr. Murray Junop, Dr. Peter Rogan (in winter term),  Dr. Caroline Schild-Poulter, Dr. Brian Shilton, and Dr. Walter Siqueira. If not listed above, please contact the faculty member of your choice.

Course Manager: Dr. Chris Brandl, Dr. E. Ball

Evaluation:

  • 25% - Supervisor Assessment
  • 15% - Lab Notebook
  • 20% Writing assignment (750words)
  • (A short abstract of selected manuscripts)
  • 5% - Oral Presentation / Poster Presentation
  • 35% - Final report (1750 words)

Instructional Information: No textbook required.

Biochemistry 3385A - Human Biochemistry

A course dealing with Biochemical aspects of the human condition. Topics in human disease, medical testing, and lifestyle will be considered in a clinical-case-oriented fashion. The emphasis will be on structural and metabolic issues related to carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, minerals, nucleic acids and proteins.

Lectures: MWF 11:30 - 12:30

Prerequisite(s): Either Biochemistry 2280A or 2288A with a mark of at least 70%.

Course Manager: Dr. Caroline Schild-Poulter
Instructors: Dr. D. O'Gorman, Dr. C. Schild-Poulter, Dr. M. Huff, Dr. S. Meakin       (alternate) Dr. M Gupta

Evaluation:

  • 50% - Midterm
  • 50% - Final

Instructional Information: Notes and lecture materials will be available to students on WebCT under individual lecturer names. A textbook is not required but may benefit individual students depending on their biochemistry knowledge and background. Two texts that approach biochemistry from a medical point of view are "Lippincott's Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry" (5th Edn, Harvey RA and Ferrier DR) and "Textbook of Biochemistry With Clinical Correlations" (7th Edn, Devlin TM).

Biochemistry 3386B - Clinical Biochemistry

The application of biochemical and molecular principles to the analytical components used to select, evaluate and interpret tests for clinical diseases. Also included will be discussions on the specialized instruments required. Students will gain understanding of the practice of clinical biochemistry, as one of the disciplines of laboratory medicine.

Lectures: MWF 9:30 - 10:30

Prerequisite(s): Either Biochemistry 2280A or 2288A with a mark of at least 70%.

Course Manager: Dr. Liju Yang
Instructors: Dr. Vipin Bhayana, Dr. Angela Rutledge, Dr. Norm Smith, Dr. S. Arnoldo.

Evaluation: The course will be taught as 3 contact hours per week on Monday, Wednesday and Fridays except for holidays and conference week. 50% of the overall mark for the course will be based on a 2-hour mid-term examination. The remaining 50% will be based on the final examination. The final exam will cover only material given during the second half of the course.
Note: All material presented in the lectures, and in the handouts may be included as questions in the two exams. The lecturers may specify or exclude specific material to be examined, at their discretion.

Instructional Information: A short outline of lecture material has been prepared by the lecturers involved, and is available for purchase at the Education Office, MBL C5 (shown as Bio Lab on Campus maps) for $25.00. Cash ONLY, exact change preferred. Additional reference information is printed in the course material or may be provided in class by the lecturers.

Biochemistry 3390B - Advanced Methods for Biochemistry

Students will explore the chemical and physical underpinnings of biochemical phenomena by solving practical, real-world, quantitative problems. Students will learn how to answer biochemical research questions by applying advanced experimental strategies and techniques, including methods in bioinformatics and the mining of biochemical databases.

Lectures: MWF 12:30 - 1:30

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 3381A and 3382A

Course Manager: Dr. Gary Shaw

Instructors: Dr. Greg Gloor, Dr. David Edgell, Dr. Gary Shaw .

Evaluation: There will be 8 assignments in this class, each worth 12.5% of your final mark. The assignments will be given out during each lab/tutorial class. Students will be allowed 2 weeks to complete each assignment. Late Policy - Assignments are due at the time and date marked on each assignment. Late assignments will not be accepted and will be given a mark or zero. There are no exams in this course.

Instructional Information: No textbook required.

Biochemistry 4410A - Molecular Biology of DNA and RNA

The use of fundamental techniques in molecular biology and molecular genetics are illustrated using examples from the classic and current literature. Selected topics include eukaryotic gene cloning, transgenic animals, rational drug design, DNA replication and cell cycle regulation.

Lectures: TuTh 12:30 - 1:30

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 3381A and 3382A (formerly 3382B).

Course Manager: Dr. D. Haniford
Instructors: Dr. C. Brandl, Dr. M. Junop

Evaluation:

  • 20% - Dr. Brandl's Assignment
  • 15% - Dr. Haniford's Assignment #1
  • 35% - Dr. Haniford's Assignment #2
  • 10% - Dr. Junop in class Quizzes
  • 20% - Dr. Junop's Assignment

Biochemistry 4415B - Applications of Synthetic Biology and Chemical Genetics in Medicine

NEW for 2015

This course will explore how metabolic pathways are currently being re-engineered in microorganisms to produce drugs that are otherwise difficult to manufacture. We will also investigate how drug targets are being identified using newly developed chemical genetic screening methods. The impact of both approaches on medicine will be evaluated.

Antirequisite(s):

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 4410A.

Course Manager: Dr. Patrick O'Donoghue

Instructors: Dr. David Haniford, Dr. Bogumil Karas, Dr. Murray Junop, Dr. P. O'Donoghue.

Instructional Information:2 lecture hours per week, 1 hr bi-weekly tutorial session, 0.5 course

Biochemistry 4420A - Molecular Biology of Proteins

Topics to be considered at an advanced level will include: protein folding, stability, dynamics and association with the membrane.

Lectures: TuTh 9:30 - 10:30

Antirequisite(s): The former Biochemistry 4420B.

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 3381A.

Course Manager: Dr. B. Shilton
Instructor: Dr. E. Ball, Dr. James Choy

Evaluation:

  • 15% - Assignment #1 (Folding, Stability, Dynamics)
  • 20% - Midterm
  • 15% - Assignment #2 (Membrane protein structure)
  • 50% - Final Exam

Instructional Information: Reading Material will be specified by the instructors and put on reserve in the library if not available through the internet. There is no required textbook for this course.

Biochemistry 4425B - Proteomics and Protein Biotechnology

NEW for 2015

The course will cover applied aspects of protein chemistry in biotechnology and protein design. Topics covered will include applications of modern analytical and biophysical techniques used in proteomics and related biochemical analyses, protein structure design, and antibody engineering.

Antirequisite(s):

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 4420A.

Course Manager: Dr. J. Choy
Instructor: Dr. E. Ball, Dr. G. Lajoie, Dr. S. Li.

Instructional Information:2 lecture hours per week, 0.5 course

Biochemistry 4450A - Molecular Genetics of Human Cancer

Key cellular pathways that are frequently subverted in tumour cells leading to neoplasia will be discussed, as well as mechanisms by which environmental factors affect tumour development. Cancer models and molecular therapies will also be considered. There are two sections of this course offered. Section 001 is an in class course and section 650 is an online distance studies course.

Please take a look at the syllabus.

Lectures: TuTh 10:30 - 11:30

Prerequisite(s): Biology 2581B, Biochemistry 3381A.

Course Manager: Dr. David Rodenhiser
Instructors: Dr. Fred Dick

Evaluation:

  • 5%   - Interactive Links
  • 10% - Quiz
  • 25% - Midterm
  • 15% - Term paper
  • 45% - Final

Instructional Information: No textbook required.

Biochemistry 4455G - Translation in Cancer Biology

Course Description:  This course will emphasize the translation of cancer research discoveries into clinical practice, emphasizing critical thinking, research design and evaluation of data from the literature and ethics. A Community-Engaged Learning (CEL) component in the curriculum will integrate students in a small group / team learning context through coordination with relevant community partners associated with cancer research, support and care. Students will engage with community partners associated with cancer research, patient support and care, and will work on a team project relevant to the partners’ needs. Biochemistry 4455G will be offered as an elective course in January 2018, available for students having the prerequisite Biochemistry 4450A. Biochemistry 4455G will be the capstone course in a BMSC Honors Specialization module in Biochemistry and Cancer Biology when offered in January 2019.

Prerequisite: Biochemistry 4450A

Tentative course syllabus.

Other information:  3 lecture/tutorial hours per week in the WALS classroom; 0.5 course.

Course Coordinator: Dr. David Rodenhiser (drodenhi@uwo.ca)

Biochemistry 4463G - Biochemistry of Genetic Diseases

In this course, knowledge of molecular biology, biochemistry, cytogenetics, and genomics is applied to the understanding of human genetic diseases. Topics of current interest are used as examples to study the transition from mutations to clinical disorders.

Lectures: TuTh 11:30 - 12:30

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 3381A.


Instructor: Dr. Peter Rogan

Evaluation:

  • 35% - Midterm
  • 35% - Final exam
  • 30% - Term paper

Instructional Information: Thompson and Thompson, Genetics in Medicine, 8th Ed.

Biochemistry 4483E - Research Project and Seminar

The major laboratory course for the Honors Specialization in Biochemistry and Honors Specialization modules combined with Biochemistry. Lectures on laboratory safety, biosafety, use of animals in research, scientific integrity; an independent research project (topic and advisor chosen by consultation between student and faculty); scientific communication (two seminars and a written report).

Although students can take the course during the fall/winter, they also have the option of completing the course in the summer (coordinated by Dr. E. Ball) between years 3 and 4. If they then complete the Biochemistry 4999 course in their 4th year, they have the option of enrolling in the Accelerated MSc. More information about the summer 4483 course, 4999 course, and the Accelerated MSc can be found on the Accelerated MSc page. 

Antirequisite(s): Biochemistry 4485E, Chemical Biology 4500E, Microbiology and Immunology 4970E, Medical Sciences 4900F/G, the former Biochemistry 4800E, 4491E.

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 3380G, 3381A and 3382A, with marks in each of at least 70%. Enrolment is limited, and is available only to students in Year 4 of Honors Specialization modules in Biochemistry, Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Biochemistry and Chemistry, and Biochemistry of Infection and Immunity, and Computational Biochemistry. Students in the Honors Specialization in Biochemistry of Infection and Immunity may substitute one of Microbiology and Immunology 3610F, 3620G, or the former 3600G with a minimum mark of 70% in lieu of Biochemistry 3380G as a prerequisite. Students in the Honors Specialization in Computational Biochemistry may substitute Biochemistry 3383F/G with a minimum mark of 70% in lieu of Biochemistry 3380G as a prerequisite.

Project coordinator: Dr. E. Ball      (alternate) Dr. S. Meakin

Evaluation:

  • 8% - First presentation (25% student, 75% faculty)
  • 12% - Final presentation (25% student, 75% faculty)
  • 30% - Supervisor
  • 50% - Final written report (marked by 2 or more faculty)

Biochemistry 4486E - Biochemistry Research Project

Details will follow.

Biochemistry 4999E - Advanced Research in Biochemistry

This laboratory course is intended for students interested in pursuing high-level research. Lectures on literature searches, data mining, and effective communication; an independent research project (topic and advisor chosen by consultation between student and faculty); scientific communication (introduction to topic, mid-year report, seminar).

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 4483E or 4485E, and permission of the department.

The Advanced Research Project (Biochemistry 4999E, 1.0 credit) is offered in the fall-winter terms. The Advanced Research Project is intended for students who are enthusiastic about scientific research and would like to gain additional experience and/or proceed to the graduate program immediately after completion of their undergraduate studies (see Accelerated MSc). The Advanced Research Project can be conducted in the same laboratory as the Year 4 Summer Honors Research Project, or a different laboratory.

Importantly, students enrolled in the Advanced Research Project will be assigned an “advisory committee,” analogous in function to the graduate advisory committees currently in place for MSc and PhD students. The supervisor and advisory committee together will be responsible for providing input into the research program, as well the student’s development as a scientist.

Project coordinator: Dr. Eric Ball,    (alternate) Dr. S. Meakin

Chemical Biology 4500E  - Research Project in Chemical Biology

The major laboratory course for students in the Honors Specialization in Chemical Biology. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students will work on an independent research project, submit reports, write a thesis describing research findings and present and defend their findings in an oral seminar. Professional development activities include: skills for critical analysis of research, writing technical reports, ethics.

Project co-ordinator: Dr. E. Ball,   (alternate) Dr. S. Meakin

Antirequisite(s): Biochemistry 4483E, 4485E, Chemistry 4491E, the former Biochemistry 4491E and Chemistry 4490E.

Prerequisite(s): Biochemistry 3380G, 3381A, 3382B; Chemistry 2271A, 2272F, 2273A, 2374A, 2281G, 2283G, 2384B; 1.0 course from: Chemistry 3371F, 3372F/G, 3373F, 3374A/B; and registration in Year 4 of the Honors Specialization in Chemical Biology.

Extra Information: 15 laboratory hours/week, 1.5 course.